It’s Here!

One of the things I love about owning a business is that I get to choose what goes on the shelves and racks. In February I met with the rep from Katia Yarns of Spain to take a look at what they have in their Spring and Summer line. It’s exciting that their entire line of yarn and fabric is now being distributed in Canada. This is exciting! The yarn I ordered just came in and as of today it is on the shelves. As much as I really wanted to order a whole lot more, I resisted temptation and limited my order to three different yarns. I’m excited to tell you about them though!

Fair Cotton Craft

This fair trade organic cotton is DIVINE! It’s put up in 200g balls and the “mileage” is superb at 620m! Katia has a number of patterns for this yarn as well; gotta love that. It creates a striped border to a lovely neutral colour. It’s available in four colourways and I have them all in stock now. With a single ball you can make a large child’s sweater. You could get a small to medium ladies’ top out of one ball if you made it with wee cap sleeves or sleeveless. They have a lovely baby blanket pattern and it takes a single ball to complete it.

The price does reflect the fact that it is fair trade and organic. And when you feel it and you see what you can make with a single ball, you won’t care about the price. It’s worth every penny. Since it arrived, I’ve been obsessing over what I want to make with it… as soon as I clear off some of my currently occupied knitting needles. If you scroll down on the link below, you will see the patterns they have for this yarn.

See them here

Scuby Cotton

I have had a lot of people ask me about macrame supplies. My sisters and I did macrame back in the late 1970’s. It’s a lot of fun and easy to get the hang of. Over a year ago I spoke to my suppliers and at that time, they told me this “flash in the pan” fad was on its way out and all they had in supplies were the colours no one wanted any more. Yet, I still had people asking me for macrame supplies. I kept hounding my suppliers and clearly other people did too. Katia’s answer to this demand is Scuby Cotton. They even have a free pattern for a plant hanger that you can download off their website! They have patterns for bags and purses, pillows, a lamp shade and an artistic wall hanging. I am working on carving out time to put together a macrame workshop. (It is likely to be toward the end of May.) This yarn is available in a large range of colours. I only brought in six, and I started with neutrals. If I get enough people interested, I will expand the selection to include other colours. Here’s a link to the yarn and again, if you scroll down, you’ll see all the patterns available. (The free plant hanger pattern is called Kayseri.)

see them here

And last but definitely not least is the Rainbow Big rug kit. Oh MY! This is just so fantastic, I’m bursting with excitement! This gradient yarn comes in a kit with one 700g ball of yarn (YES, you read right!) It seamlessly shifts from one colour to the next. A crochet hook and an easy pattern that will result in a 48″ rug are included with it. That’s a decent size. The yarn is presented in a clear zippered pouch with a grommet in the centre so you can leave the ball in the bag and pull it through the hole to minimize risk of tangling. (If you’re anything like me, you’d be hanging onto that zippered pouch when the rug is finished, to use with other projects.) Think about it. No need to change colours; no big pile of skeins or balls of yarn to manage; an easy crochet pattern; the colourway shifts without any effort and just two tails to weave in when the project is done. It will make anyone look like a genius! I only brought in four of these to begin with, each in a different colourway. If enough people get as excited as I am about these, I’ll happily bring in more. Here’s a link.

At the end of April I’ll be attending Katia’s open house to view and pre-order yarns for next fall and winter. I’ll be checking out their fabrics and sewing patterns too. We’ll see whether or not I’ll dive into that pond when the time comes.

Happy Crafting!

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Mysteries of Gauge

There are a number of things that affect the gauge of our knit and crochet projects. Subtle things to consider that can help you to understand how your particular nuances can affect your gauge.

The Gauge Swatch

In terms of knit and crochet, gauge translates to how many stitches across by how many rows high fit in a 10cm x 10cm (4″ x 4″) square. Typically, the expectation is that you will knit or crochet a gauge swatch to identify each yarn’s suitability to a project. You may have seen memes that declare something to the effect that swatches are for sissies. Be aware that most of the people making these declarations are highly experienced. In all fairness, they already know how those different yarns will behave in their hands on their favourite hook or needles. There are times when it’s definitely in your best interest to take the time to work up a gauge swatch. Especially if you are making a fitted garment! Making a blanket or scarf? Gauge won’t be that critical.

So here’s the thing. Each one of us handles our tools similarly, but with subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) differences. These differences ultimately result in variations in tension on our working yarn. That difference in tension subsequently affects the outcome of our gauge.

Breaking it down: Hands & Confidence

Some people have very relaxed hands and will knit with a very “soft” or “gentle” tension. On the other end of the spectrum, some work with an iron grip and stretch the yarn aggressively as they work. Their tension will be “hard” or “tight”. As you can imagine, someone with soft tension will end up with larger, softer stitches than someone with hard tension. I prefer to use the words “hard” and “soft”. Some say tight and loose. The terminology I use relates to how your resulting fabric will feel as well. Soft tension gives you soft fabric, hard tension gives you harder, denser fabric. Obviously, there is a range reflected here. Each of us is somewhere on that spectrum. Add to this that some people are naturally very coordinated and others are not. You can love to crochet or knit and not necessarily be a naturally coordinated person. If that’s you, then you will probably always work with a slightly harder/tighter tension.

It is very common for beginners to have hard tension as they develop the coordination required for either knitting or crochet. The tendency is to have a lot of physical tension in your hands (and shoulders) as you are learning. Your mind will also be working overtime. As you gain experience, most people will gradually become more relaxed both mentally and physically. As confidence grows, the mind, shoulders and hands are able to relax and tension naturally softens. Some folks will still keep a harder tension, even when they are relaxed. None of this is either good or bad, it is just information. What is important is to determine where you are on that scale and how it relates to the resulting tension on your yarn; this relates directly to the gauge you will produce. Hard tension will result in a finer gauge than suggested on a yarn label. If you know that, you can go up a needle/hook size or two to accommodate your tension and get the result that the pattern and yarn identify.

Breaking it Down: Needles & Hooks

Nowadays, you could write an encyclopedia about knitting needles and crochet hooks. You can purchase them made of a very wide range of materials. Each material has its own particular qualities. Talk to anyone who knits and crochets a lot and they will have their favourites. My go-to is generally wood. There are many brands out there. I like Knitter’s Pride Dreamz needles for most things. They are finished wood (as opposed to being raw unfinished wood). I refer to needles on a scale that has “grabby” on one end and “slick” on the other end. I refer to the difference as a range of “smoothness”. Again, that’s my own personal way of describing it. For some yarns I prefer Knitter’s Pride Nova Platina needles. These are what I would refer to as slick. Some people really like a grabby needle that will hold the yarn firmly until they decide to move it. Other people like a very slick needle that will allow the yarn to slide with no effort whatsoever. The different materials used to make the various lines of needles allow you to choose what degree of smoothness you want to work with. When I say needles, I really mean both crochet hooks and knitting needles. It truly applies to both.

In regard to needles, another thing to bear in mind is that different fibres also have varying degrees of grabbiness. This refers to the texture of the yarn and the degree to which the fibres cling to the needle material as you work the yarn. I like to use a variety of needles relative to the project and the yarn I’m using. I’ll choose a smoother needle to work with grabbier yarn, and a grabbier needle to work with smoother yarn. The smoothness of the needles can affect how much tension you hold in your body as you knit. This can subtly affect your gauge as well. You may knit tighter with chrome plated needles than you do with bamboo needles.

How it all Relates:

Each yarn will indicate the gauge you can expect, with suggested needle sizes. The more comfortable and relaxed you are, the closer to the suggested gauge you will work.

Over the next few months I’ll be setting up a permanent “yarn and needle tasting” station in the store. I’ll have a number of baskets, each with a different style of needle and yarn so you can sit down and try them out to see what feels good to you. Stay tuned for updates!

I sincerely hope this information is helpful to you.

Happy Knitting and Crocheting!

Scrub-a-dub-dub!

For years, knitters and crocheters have been making cotton cloths for kitchen or bathroom use. Besides the obvious facecloths and dishcloths, many are also making reusable makeup pads. These are small but relatively thick crocheted or knitted circles around 2 to 3 inches across, specifically for removing makeup. Others also make pot scrubbers; the new yarns available mean you don’t even have to cut up any tulle to do so! Trivets, potholders, tea-cozies, placemats… whether a kitchen-specific bundle of goodies, or a spa-related combination of items, these make fantastic gifts that are quick, easy and inexpensive to make. Add to this that they are small projects that won’t make you sweat as the weather gets warmer and you have a recipe for some fun, satisfying, warm-weather crafting.

Around the time when I brought in over 50 colours of “dishcloth” cotton yarn, I also brought in a yarn that is specifically designed for making pot scrubbers. It’s a Rico product called Creative Bubble. It’s available in 23 solid colours and 5 multi-colours. (I don’t have all the colours in stock, but I’m happy to bring other colours in if people want them.)

Rico has a number of patterns to go along with this yarn. The pattern that we did up includes a watermelon slice and a pineapple. You could simply crochet little circles if you wanted to, but these are so cute that I challenge you to resist them! We were able to get two pineapples out of one ball of yellow and three watermelon slices out of one pink ball. The only thing was that the third watermelon slice was one round smaller than the pattern said. You’d never know to look at it. Clearly green was also used for these. (Oh and a quick note: The Rico patterns use UK terminology. Be sure you know the difference if you are used to North American terminology. It makes a difference!)

Each of these scrubbies are as big as my hand. I have been using a pineapple scrubby at home to get a sense of how it behaves and I’m loving it. They are double thickness; they feel soft and cushy under your hand and they are large enough that you can really get some work done with ease. My husband commented that he thought they felt softer than the puffs we use in the shower. Speaking of shower puffs. You know when you put body wash onto those puffs and they get nice and lathery? Well that’s what the scrubbies do when you put the dish washing liquid onto them. They are fabulous!

I did a quick search on Ravelry and found a few easy patterns for scrubbies. The first one is just a nice basic pan scrubby. The second one combines a dishcloth with a scrubby. I’ll be bringing in more patterns from Rico, including a doughnut with sprinkles. How fun is that? If you are inclined to do a search, you may want to try with each of: scrubby, scrubbie and scrubber.

Pan Scrubber

Dish Scrubby

As winter makes way for spring you don’t have to abandon your crochet or knitting. You can always just shift from wool blends to cotton, linen and bamboo yarns. Choosing smaller projects means you won’t be roasting under an in-progress afghan in the height of summer’s heat.

If you are tired of making plain old dishcloths, a quick search on Ravelry will bring up a plethora of designs to choose from. If you want to find some really lovely ones, do a search with the word “spa” and see what comes up. I suppose that technically these would be considered facecloths. You can use any of the dishcloth cotton yarns available to make up spa sets. You could include a headband (to hold your hair out of the way while you wash your face), small round make-up pads, facecloths and shower puffs. The puffs could be made of either cotton, or a yarn like Rico Creative Bubble. Pair all that with your favourite luxury soap, maybe a candle, a bottle of wine, and you have a fantastic gift for someone who deserves to pamper themselves. I’ve included links to ravelry pages to offer some inspiration:

Aubrey Spa Set

Spa Day Set

Mini Almost Lost Washcloth

Extra Luscious Bath Puff

Easy Face Scrubbies

I don’t know about you, but I’m always on the lookout for gift ideas that won’t break my budget, whether that be in relation to time, money or brain power. If you’re looking for projects that you can do in front of the television in the evenings (or in the back yard, when the weather is nice), any of these will fit the bill.

The other nice thing about these is that you can make them up in no time, in advance and stockpile a bunch of them. Make up some in classy neutral colours and others in fun and vibrant combinations. When you suddenly need a gift, you can put together a nice little package to fit the need at the time, effortlessly. Tie it all up with a pretty ribbon or some hemp cording and you’ll look like a genius.

Happy Knitting… and Crocheting!

So Many Lovely New Things!

Who doesn’t love to see new things? I’m excited to tell you about a bunch of new products that I recently added to my inventory.

Recently, I had a couple customers ask me to bring in a line of sock yarn from Lang yarns. Ooh! The colours are so YUMMY! This ombre yarn has lovely gradual colour shifts that allow for a nice tall sock. The balls are 50g, and each sold separately. One ball makes a nice tall knee sock. The colours make me think of ice cream and sorbet. I brought in nine different colourways. It is already proving popular; I didn’t even have a chance to get it onto the shelf before it started to sell. It is soft to the touch and did I mention that the colours are very pretty? I am determined to finish a couple projects before I cast on a pair of socks in this one. I know I won’t be able to resist the yellow!

Sudz cotton dish-cloth yarn from Estelle has been a big hit since I first brought it in. I initially stocked around 50 colours. Last week I added another big bunch of colourways. This economical yarn comes in 50g balls and the huge colour selection means that you will never have to be bored making dishcloths!

Knitter’s Pride Ginger Double Pointed Sock Needle Sets are in. Wow! The case is absolutely gorgeous! The DPN sets range from 2mm up to 5.5mm. If you love making socks or mittens on DPN’s you will adore this set!

Knitters are likely to be aware of the trend toward short circular needles. So the idea is that if you are making a hat, you use a 40cm (16″) circular needle for the body of it. The stitches all fit comfortably on it. You can switch to magic loop, 2 circulars or DPN’s when you decrease at the top, but the bulk of the hat is done on one short circular. This is a lovely way to knit. I now have 40cm knitting needles in both the Aero brand (which is quite budget conscious) and Knitter’s Pride Dreamz (which are an absolute joy to knit with and worth the extra investment if your budget allows).

Not only are we seeing short circulars for hats, but the latest trend is to use 25cm (10″) circular needles for knitting socks. It’s the same idea. When I first tried these out, I was determined to hate them. By the end of the first sock, I had fallen in love. It takes about a sock to get accustomed to these. The needle tips are very short and you do have to adjust the way you hold them a bit because there isn’t much tip length to anchor your hand against. I found that I needed to be very conscious of how I held them and where my hand felt uncomfortable so that I could be deliberate with what I needed to change in my hand position. This meant that I could relax my hand and the knitting went much quicker. I do find that the first 10 rounds after completing the toe (on toe-up socks) feels a little tight because the toe pulls against the stitches at first. Once you get those rounds done, that feeling goes away. I also found that if I do socks (4ply) with fewer than 54 stitches, it starts to feel a bit tight on the needles. So I only use them for adult sizes. I carry these in Knitter’s Pride Dreamz now from 2.25mm up to 5mm. Not everyone will love these, but they are worth giving a try.

I now carry a few new adhesive products. Sobo premium craft and fabric glue is a popular product that most crafters will recognize. I have it in the 2 oz squeeze bottles now. Patch Attach is another adhesive product that I have added to our line-up. I still carry Aileen’s Fabric Fusion pens and the old stand-by, Speed Sew.

I recently expanded my thread selection as well. I brought in 2 new thread cabinets that are filled with 500m spools of Mettler Metrosene 100% Polyester thread and Mettler Silk Finish 100% Cotton thread respectively. I’m excited about this. These cabinets have a really nice selection of the most popular thread colours in a nice big spool.

The expanding sewing gauge is another cool new product. This accordion style gauge allows you to easily adjust to locate where to attach buttons and buttonholes evenly on a garment or other project.

Pressing loops can be a real challenge. This set is designed to allow you to press them with ease. Whether you are making spaghetti straps for a top or a dress, or using them in your quilts or other decorator projects, this tool will make you want to think up projects just so you can use it! You’ll wonder how you ever lived without it!

Besides the typical rotary cutting tool, many crafters use the Xacto style crafting knife. I recently brought in replacement blades for this style of knife.

A new addition to our Schmetz sewing machine needle line up is the Microtex needle in 8 gauge or multipack.

When you knit a project as a gift, sometimes you just want to be sure people know that it was crafted by hand with love. I found a few new “handcrafted” cloth labels that are easy to stitch onto your hand knits and look fantastic.

Last but not least, I have brought in some new books. Most notably is “Sew and Play: Handmade Games for Kids”. This is a delightful guide to sewing games for children. It includes full instructions and patterns for games including: Capture the Tag; Monster Ball; Pancake Party; Snake Pit; Gone Fishin’ and more. With a total of 11 games, this book is a gem!

I love being able to bring in new and interesting things to expand the selection for my customers. I especially love it when I find something that enhances my knitting or sewing experience.

Happy Knitting!

Kinda Like the 70’s

I have lots of great memories of the 1970’s. The clothes (well except for Fortrel, that stuff was nasty and don’t let anyone try and tell you otherwise) the cars, the television shows, the music… One of the great things that I loved about the 1970’s was how many fibre arts were in fashion then.

Knitting, embroidery, macrame, crochet, quilting, cross stitch, needlepoint and sewing were all common pastimes.

As a young girl I found inspiration in all things fibre.

I loved to sew and I loved the peasant style blouses that had hand embroidered necklines in bright colours and designs that spoke of rich ethnic connections. I loved knitting and crochet, cross stitch and spinning. I wanted to do it all. I drove my poor parents batty in my quest to understand how it was all done and to try it all. I had a passionate drive to get to the bottom of every process. Once I was convinced I had grasped it I dove into the next challenge with a single minded fervor that simply could not be quelled. I absolutely thirsted for it!

I can hear my parents complain that I never settled into any one thing. In a way they were right.

I settled into two things: music and fibres. Everything I loved most involved those two things.

I still love all that stuff today. It just sucks that there are only 24 hours in a day. There are choices that have to be made in order to be able to enjoy the experiences I love and keep the bills paid and keep up with all that other stuff adults have the privilege of being responsible for.

Many of the skills and passions I nurtured and developed throughout my life have become all but lost arts. There was a time when sewing was considered a vital life skill. They don’t teach it in school here any more. What passes for an introduction to sewing is, shamefully, barely a glance in the direction of a sewing machine. I suppose I should be grateful, since that means my skills are actually valued now. My business relies on people wanting their items fixed but being unable (or unwilling) to do it themselves.

And yet I see and feel a resurgence of those beautiful practical activities.

The fibre arts are making a comeback in a big way.

I couldn’t be happier. And it’s exciting to see the growth of it all.

I love it when people come to my store and tell me they are just learning a fibre art. It’s exciting and I am thrilled that I have the privilege and opportunity to share my extensive experience and knowledge with them. I want to do what I can to help them to have the kind of experience that will make them want to grow, nurture and sustain these interests too.

I have been responding to this shift by expanding my selection in the store to greet the need. Little by little, what I carry is reflecting how public interest in fibre arts is growing.

It’s exciting!

It’s flint to a fire; it makes me want to embroider and cross stitch again. Perhaps it’s time for me to plan out some beginner classes to teach these methods and be the spark that ignites a passion for fibre arts in a whole new generation; even if only a few people at a time.

There are so many things now that are reminiscent of the 1970’s. The “neo-hippies” share many of the same desires of the hippies from back then, but they have so much more at their fingertips than folks did back then. There is an idealistic spirit that has persevered all along that I can relate to. Today’s hippie-leaning folk have incredible technology at their fingertips. Yet there is still the desire for simplicity, practicality, accountability and sustainability that I remember and hold dear.

I try to keep up with what’s going on, but I have to be honest. As much as I love technology, I find that the pace of change of it has begun to feel like a rat-race to me. The shifting trends can start to feel excessive and superfluous. Don’t get me wrong. I love that social media and the internet have allowed regular people like me to have this kind of platform to connect with others (many of whom we will never meet in person). As the context of our lives changes along with our new technologies it’s easy to feel out of touch with it all. It’s interesting to me, to see how differently the newer generations are with technology. It is such a natural thing to them and they don’t even realize it. The marketplace is changing. How we do business is changing. Business models that were in place since the industrial revolution are disappearing completely. Back in the 70’s there was no internet. Computers took up the entire floor of a building. If you phoned a friend and they were not home, you couldn’t leave a message for them and they had no way of knowing you had called. Back then, you could tell someone you called them 10 times without an answer and no one would know if you were exaggerating or not. LOL

In this fast-paced and ever changing world, when I find myself frustrated with all the intangibles that I have to try and keep up with, I know I can count on my wonderful fibres. (In the back of my mind, I know and I’m truly grateful that I can login to Ravelry to find patterns.)

But, I can pick up my knitting and it will be there like a solid friend. The knits will be knits. The purls will be purls. My embroidery thread will always be 6 strands thick in an exquisite rainbow of blissful colours.

And I can pick up my fibre arts project and escape to the “touch-it, feel-it” things that have remained kinda like the 70’s.

Happy Crafting

Let’s Get Worsted, in Kettle Valley!

This year, I finally felt ready to hunt for local hand-dyed yarns and patterns to sell in my store. I believe strongly in supporting local small business whenever possible. Now that I have built up my inventory of staple yarns I really wanted to offer something a bit more luxurious. I had a small selection of hand-dyed yarns in solid colours, but I wanted something with really interesting colourways. I found it.

Black Cat Custom Yarn is located in Chilliwack, BC (Canada).

I was excited to have the opportunity to meet the owners this fall and to see and feel their yarns in person. A customer told me about them and I was not disappointed. I brought in a modest selection of two weights of Black Cat yarn. It has been a hit.

I have already placed another order and they are dying it now. Once it arrives it will expand the selection to 17 colourways of “Let’s Get Worsted” and 15 colourways of “Everyday Sock”. The price point is typical of hand dyed yarn.

I recently made up a project using the “Damsel” colourway of  Black Cat’s “Let’s Get Worsted”. The pattern was the Kettle Valley Shawl from Knox Mountain Knit Company out of Kelowna, BC.

So first of all, I should have done a gauge check. I didn’t and my gauge was a bit soft. I ended up using three and a half skeins rather than the three that the pattern called for. That was definitely on me. I’m confident that it could be done with three if the gauge is matched.

The Pattern: Kettle Valley Shawl by Knox Mountain Knit Co.

knox-mountain-knit-coKnox Mountain Knit Co. patterns are inspired by landmarks of the Okanagan Valley in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. I love that each has a short write-up describing what inspired the pattern. They are beautifully printed on sturdy paper and priced reasonably. They all come with a Ravelry code that allows you to have both the hard copy and a Ravelry download to access on your devices. I now have hard copies of all their designs for sale in my store. (The patterns are displayed in two binders; if you’re in the store ask me where to find them. You can also view them on Ravelry.) The photographs are beautiful. They offer sets (hats, mittens and cowls) that are sold separately but made to coordinate. This is a wonderful option if you are making gifts… especially for those individuals whose birthdays land near Christmas.

The instructions were clear and easy to follow. I loved the twisted stitch method used. The first few times I did it, I had to check the instructions but once I comprehended what was happening and why it worked, I was off to the races. It’s a nice big shawl without being so large as to feel like a blanket. It was my first worsted weight shawl and I had my doubts because I like lace shawls and I love to knit with sock weight yarn. I think I may have been converted. Yes, by the final row I was knitting 357 stitches. However, I finished this, knitting leisurely in front of the TV in the evenings over the course of 10 days. I didn’t even knit every evening. It is made up of sections that when viewed as a whole mimic the trestles of the historic Kettle Valley Railway in the vicinity of Kelowna, British Columbia. I found that with each section, it took very little time to get a sense of the pattern so I could just knit away without checking the reference. That’s how I like it! I’m delighted with the outcome and so is the person who received it as a gift.

The Yarn: Black Cat Custom Yarn; Damsel; weight “Let’s Get Worsted”

This yarn was an absolute pleasure to knit. It was soft and smooth. The stitch definition is fantastic. All the effort I put into creating those trestles stood out and made the pattern proud. It reminds me of Malabrigo yarn. Sometimes when I make a larger project I get a little bored of looking at the yarn by the end of the project. Not with this yarn! There is just no getting bored of this yarn. The colourways are so fun and the names are nerdy and sometimes a bit cheeky. It definitely has personality. I washed it with Eucalan and blocked it. I thought it was soft before I washed it. Washing it softened it even more. I sat there squishing it between my hands and against my face for ages! I guess you figured out that I highly recommend this yarn.

Because it is dyed to order, it takes some time from when I order it until it arrives. That’s probably the only real drawback to this yarn. Once I get a sense of how much and how frequently I need to reorder, that will be less of an issue.

I encourage you to take the time to check out Black Cat Custom Yarn and Knox Mountain Knit Co. Both of these small BC businesses offer a high quality product for a reasonable price. If you want to make a special gift for someone you care about, I recommend combining the two for something truly memorable.

Happy Knitting!

Wow! Too Easy! More Gift Ideas

Anyone who crafts or sews will likely own a rotary cutter. These handy tools come in a few different sizes ranging from 28mm to 60mm. The size I find most popular is 45mm. The round blades are razor sharp and allow for nice clean cutting of fabrics and other craft materials. The newest style of blade opens up a whole vista of crafting possibilities.

The regular rotary cutter blade is simply a razor sharp disc that makes a solid clean and straight cut. You can also purchase wave blades that give a gently zig-zagged edge, like you would expect from pinking shears.

What I am excited to tell you about is the new skip cut blade. The skip cut blade has gaps around the cutting edge of the disc. It has many short cutting edges with equal spaces between them. When you use this blade, it gives you small cuts at regular intervals. For the creative individual, the possibilities for this blade are exciting. I just want to talk about two applications.

Quick and Easy Fleece Blanket with a Crochet Border

You start with a piece of Nordic/Polar Fleece fabric. With the edges cleanly cut, corners rounded off and the selvedges removed, use a ruler and rotary cutter fitted with the skip blade and cut an inch in from the outside edge all around the piece of fabric. It’s important to do this in one pass. Press firmly so that you are sure you are cutting all the way through. You now have a series of holes evenly spaced an inch in from the edge of the fabric. This gives you a place to easily crochet into so you can create a crocheted border all around your blanket. The edge folds in half, so you have a double layer of fabric contained within the first round of your crochet edge. I found two different links that show how to do this. Both are relatively long, however they give the necessary information well. The second one is more thorough a demonstration than the first.

 

Fleece Lined Blanket

The next project I want to share with you is a fleece lined blanket.

You can start with either a crocheted or a knitted blanket that you have already completed. You can either measure your blanket and use those measurements as a guide, or you can lay the blanket on the fleece to mark its size instead. Either way, you want to end up with a full inch all the way around the blanket. In other words, if your blanket is 45″ x 60″, you will want to cut a piece of fleece that is 47″ x 62″. As with the example above, you will use the skip cut rotary blade to make your nice tidy row of holes around the edge. You will have to take some liberties with how you align what you are crocheting with the existing stitches in the crocheted or knitted blanket. I would personally pin the edge profusely before beginning the process of crocheting the fleece to the edge of the blanket. Below is a link to a video in which this technique is demonstrated. This video is very thorough and assumes that you are a beginner.

I was introduced to skip cut blades by a customer who was traveling through Revelstoke. She stopped in my yarn shop and asked whether I carried them. I had never heard of them. While we chatted, I looked it up online through my supplier and found them. I brought them in for her and mailed them to her when they arrived. At the time, I brought in the packs of 5 as they are more cost effective than the individual blades. I have a couple packs still in stock. My next notions order will include some singles, so that if people want to try one out without committing to 5 of them, they have that option. I have a variety of solid colours of fleece in stock and many options for yarn that could be combined with it to make it special. What a great, easy gift to make someone’s life just a little more cozy.

As always, if you like the videos I have linked to and you want to see more from the folks who took the time, effort and care to create them, show them some love. Give them your likes, share the link or subscribe to their channel. Let’s support those amazing creative people in our world. 🙂

Happy Crocheting!