Keeping it Local

Today, I want to tell you about a local designer. Her name is Jasmine, and she’s the maker and designer behind Ocean Peak Designs (formerly Kicheko Designs). She opened her Etsy store to sell handmade items quite a few years ago, and has really poured herself into her business over the past couple of years.

“I saw it as a great opportunity to be able to work from home, while raising my two young children, who are 2 and 4.”


I asked Jasmine about how she got
started on this road to design

“This journey as a maker has really evolved a lot over the past couple of years. 2019 was my first proper market season, and I was so surprised and excited at the success of those. I’ve always LOVED trying new patterns, pairing those with the perfect yarn, choosing colours and combinations, learning new techniques and stitches, and combining all of that together in to the art of crochet.”


I asked her how she evolved from making
market items to pattern testing

“I’ve loved making finished products to sell, but when I discovered pattern testing, it was a new avenue to challenge myself and continue to learn. I can clearly remember my first ever pattern test. Honestly, initially I was motivated because it meant I got a free pattern. Being quite active on Instagram, I was able to connect and follow some incredible designers. These designers would put out pattern tester calls for their up and coming patterns, and I figured I’d give it a shot. I’d never crocheted a cardigan before, but I applied to test it, and to my absolute delight, I was chosen. It was such a fun experience, and have since fallen in love with pattern testing. I’ve done countless pattern tests now, and have taken away so much from each one.”

“To pattern test is a lot of work. You’re not just making an item for pleasure – you’re grammar checking, spell checking, checking stitch counts, critiquing the flow and usability of the pattern, writing notes and relaying them to the designer, you’re taking photos in good lighting and highlighting the designer’s pattern, you’re chatting with other testers, you’re modelling the item, checking the fit, investing in yarn for it, checking gauge and doing swatches, measuring as you go and measuring once it is complete. It’s quite a full on process, but having a pattern tested really insures the best possible outcome. While it’s a lot of work to test, I really love it. I joked over the winter, that if I could be paid to pattern test, I would. It’s such a challenge and it’s so fun working with other people and designers. I’ve met some incredible people through this process, and feel constantly challenged creatively.”


Clearly, the experience of pattern testing
was an inspiring one for Jasmine

“In the fall of 2019, it started getting to the point where I would find myself envisioning what I wanted to create. I personally never thought I’d end up designing anything. I was so happy to test and purchase patterns, because wow, are there ever talented and creative people out there. I would spend hours searching Ravelry, Etsy and Instagram for patterns that caught my eye, or were what I was envisioning. The designing happened when I couldn’t find what I was exactly what I was looking for.”

“I’d sit down with my trusty old notepad, and write everything down as I was crocheting. The whole process of creating was so invigorating. In the midst of market season where I was preparing and making the same thing (sometimes over and over), it was so freeing to be able to have another avenue for creativity. It was really essential, so that I continued to love what I do, and I didn’t get lost in the production of market season.”

“Since the new year, I’ve released 2 hat patterns. I have another pattern being tested right now, and have been so blessed to collaborate with an incredibly talented indie yarn dyer, with that pattern set to release in March. I also have a few other designs that will come to life pretty soon.”

“To start pattern designing was actually incredibly daunting. I had so many questions, and it felt like such a big scary world. The fears were real – would anyone even want my pattern? Would I accidentally copy others? Would others copy me (oh how heartbreaking)? I mean the list goes on and on. But thanks to friends who are currently designing, and an incredible community online, I’ve been able to push through and just do it, while asking for much needed direction and help. I can say that with each pattern that has been designed, tested and released, it really has gotten easier. I’m continually growing and changing as a maker, and discovering what I really love to do. This is my journey at the moment, and I think if you have ever made something without a pattern, then you’re a designer too.”


You can find Jasmine’s handmade items on

oceanpeakdesigns.ca | Etsy

Or catch them in person at The Trading Post and The Wax Bench; both retailers are located in the downtown core of Revelstoke, BC.

Jasmine’s crochet patterns are available on Ravelry

I love seeing people’s creativity shine! I encourage you to check out what Jasmine has to offer.

Happy Creating!

Knitters, Organize!

There are a lot of cool tools and gadgets for knitters these days. Most of the knitters I know have amassed a bit of a collection of very useful and handy tools. Interchangeable needle tips and cords, stitch markers, stitch holders, cable needles, DPN’s, single points, row counters, finishing needles, crochet hooks and the list goes on. And mostly, those tools end up in a bit of a mess in project bags, on the coffee table, night stand and goodness knows where else.

Guess what? Help is on its way!

I like to be organized. Mostly, I like to be organized because I’m kinda lazy. I’ve learned over the years that staying organized saves a lot of time and energy. I made myself a sewing tool-belt so that when I work, I have all my most important tools right at my fingertips. If not for that, (and sometimes even with that) I would be leaving my tools sitting wherever I happened to use them last. Before I made the tool-belt I wasted a ton of time trying to remember where and when I last used whatever tool it was that I needed next. Although from time to time, I still set my scissors down and forget to put them in my holster, for the most part it does keep me organized.

I can truly relate to having my knitting tools all over the place. I have a main knitting bag that I generally keep my most current projects in. I had tins and zipper pouches and baskets. I just found that I was constantly hunting for what I needed. I knew I owned what I was looking for but often simply couldn’t find it. (The nice thing about the tin was that I could keep my extra magnets for my pattern holder in the lid and I managed to not lose my darning needles by attaching them to that magnet.)

Thing is, I always have a number of projects on the go. They don’t all fit in one bag.

So that in itself can create a bit of a challenge. I really did try to keep everything together but this whole being human thing is just messy by nature. I don’t beat myself up too much about it any more. I try to take it in stride. However, as a small business owner, my down time is super-duper-ultra precious to me and in short supply. So when I want to sit down and knit, it irritates me if I can’t find what I need quickly and easily.

Last summer Stephanie Cookhouse of Cookhouse Wares in Calgary, Alberta, popped in my store. We chatted and she told me about this cool thing she makes. She makes organizers designed for creative people who have lots of do-dads that need a home all together. These sturdy felt binders have plastic ziplocky type pouches in them. She makes them in two sizes. I only brought in the larger size because I know myself and the small ones would be a tease for me. Immediately when she showed me the samples I knew this creative woman was on to something fantastic. They are attractive and oh so very practical.

So, I’ve been using mine for a few months now. It took me a little while to kind of get my groove with it. I took some photos to give you an idea. Mine is absolutely stuffed. I can close it, although in complete honesty, mostly I don’t bother trying to. Because I access it a lot for my tools that I use all the time with my knitting, it doesn’t really matter if it’s too full to close. I wanted to show just how much stuff I pack into this little book. It’s the size of a half size binder; the sort that takes a letter size page that’s cut in half.

Now granted, I’m sure that the way I use this organizer will evolve over time. Right now, I’m using one. As you can see in the photo it’s absolutely bulging with knitty awesomeness. I can imagine using two of them. A lot of my tools are currently in projects. When those projects are completed, (or scrapped as the case may be) I will need a place to store the needles where I can actually find them when I want to. So what I’m imagining is that I would have one for all of my interchangeable needles and cords. I don’t use a lot of DPN’s as I really love my circular needles, both interchangeable and fixed. So I can easily keep my DPN’s in the main organizer along with the important stuff that I use with most every project. That would include my tape measure, stitch markers, finishing needles, pencil, eraser, highlighter, scissors, stitch holders, cable needles and a few crochet hooks for the odd time when I need them. (My needle keepers are almost always in use on my projects) I imagine that the main one would be where I do most of my knitting but float wherever I take a project. The other one would likely stay with my stash. When I start a project I see myself grabbing whatever size needle tips I’ll need for the project and transfer those into the main organizer so they are handy when I’m ready for them. We’ll see how it goes.

I absolutely love this organizer.

I don’t know how I ever lived without it. With the help of some small ziploc bags and my Dymo LabelWriter printer, I feel like the size of the pouches is perfect to keep my knitting tools together and easy to sort through. I highly recommend this organizer! Congratulations, Stephanie Cookhouse, on a fantastic product!

Happy Organizing!

Social Saturdays are Back!

The season to curl up with your favourite fibre art projects is back. YAY! Since the frost hit, I’ve had many people asking when we would be starting up our Social Saturdays Stitching Circle. As of this weekend (November 30, 2019) we’ll be back at it.

If you are new to Revelstoke, or if you are just visiting and you aren’t familiar with Social Saturdays, here’s the scoop.

Social Saturday is a free, drop in group that meets every Saturday throughout the winter months (until around the middle of April) at Judy’s Designs at #103 – 217 Victoria Rd. East in Revelstoke, BC.

Feel free to bring any portable fibre arts related project. It could be anything from cross stitch or embroidery to knitting, crochet, needle felting or needle punching, hand quilting, you name it. We will have the coffee on and a kettle nearby if you prefer to drink tea.

These are not classes, just gathering opportunities so you can hang out with other fibre enthusiasts and spend some social time while making some progress on your projects. (If you are looking for actual instruction, pop in and ask Judy about signing up. There will be classes offered in January, 2020.) However, if you have hit a bit of a snag and you need some fresh eyes to help you figure out how to continue on, we’re happy to help you. Judy is experience in most fibre arts and can usually help you if you are stuck and need some help.

Social Saturdays start at 10:30 am and run to 3:00 pm on all Saturdays that Judy’s Designs is open. (We close on the Saturdays of long weekends and between Christmas Eve and New Year’s.) You don’t have to call ahead and you don’t have to hang out all day. Pop in for the day or for an hour, whatever works for you. We’ll be happy to see you.

Hope to see you!

Tips for Tardy Gift Makers

Every year I have good intentions that I’ll start making gifts early in the year; you know, so that there isn’t a grand panic when fall shifts into winter. (Now what was it my dad always said about good intentions?) There have been one or two years when I managed it. Sadly this year isn’t one of them. Let me share with you some ways I have found to be more efficient at this gift making time of year.

As we sail along the rails of the Pinterest and Instagram inspiration rides, it’s important to be more than just a little ruthless in your search. Personally, I have found that sticking to Ravelry.com is more efficient. There will almost always be a pattern available for the search results. At this time of year, you really have to have a clear mission in mind.

First off, you have to know what your end-game is. How many gifts do you want/need to make. Being clear will save you resources on every level. As I search in Ravelry (using the advanced search function), I like to open each project that catches my eye in a new tab. I’ll systematically do this first, working through my search results. Then I’ll go through all those tabs and eliminate the ones that don’t live up to my current needs. I bookmark the ones I’m seriously considering by adding them to my favourites or immediately downloading the pattern.

Make notes and keep them in one place.

What is it, who is it for, what materials do you need, when does it have to be done, what’s the budget?

I see people getting lost in their phones trying to find the information they need so they can buy their supplies. Often, they are unable to find the pattern at all. I like to use a free app called Knit Companion to organize my patterns. Minimally, this allows you to have those patterns all in one place for easy access on your devices. Printing out the patterns can also be helpful.

Stash-bust before you go shopping.

Once you have that list, go through your stash to see what will work for those projects. Bundle the pattern and supplies together and label them so you don’t have to try and remember what you did. Check those off your list and make a note of what you decided to use. Spending a little time to organize this information will save you a lot of time, money, energy and frustration later.

Keep it simple.

As much as the intricate patterns with amazing detail are attractive and dazzling, be honest. You don’t have time for that! It’s the end of November. But, that doesn’t mean that your gifts have to be boring. For instance, let’s say you are making a scarf or a cowl. You can make a plain knitted or crocheted long rectangle, put a knot in it and then attach the ends together. Presto, you have a funky cowl and all you did was knit or crochet a rectangle. Use chunky yarn and it will work up quickly. Funky buttons, simple embroidered motifs, tassles, pom-poms, using a mini stuffed toy instead of a pom-pom, “hand-made” labels, adding a crocheted rosette or square in a complimentary yarn are all ways to take a simple design up a notch.

Sticking with the super simple theme, there are all kinds of self-patterning yarns available that come with instructions. The yarn does the work for you. For instance, Magic Diamonds from Katia will give you an argyle (diagonal plaid) design and with one ball (and a bit of a contrasting yarn for the border), you can make a cowl. Katia Big Paint is a self striping yarn that comes with a pattern to knit or crochet a hat or to make a scarf. One ball makes a hat with a pom, whether you knit or crochet it. The knit scarf takes 3 balls, but the yarn is thick and works up fast. How cool is that? Cascade Curiosity is typically used for shawls, but, you can get three toques (beanies for non-Canadians) out of one ball. The colours shift subtly and each hat is different. Throw a faux fur pom on there and you have a gorgeous gift that is easy to make while you’re watching television.

But, you don’t necessarily have to do it all yourself. If your recipient is crafty, why not consider giving them a kit? Got a friend that loves to knit? Pick out a knitting pattern and the yarn to go with it and bundle it up with a “some assembly required” note card. Has your sister been talking about how much she’d love to learn how to needle felt? Buy a kit that has everything that you need to make it. Got a crafty niece or nephew? How about a knitting loom and enough yarn to make a hat or a scarf? I brought in crochet kits that include the hook, yarn, instructions and finishing notions for making bags. We have rug kits from Spain that include all the self patterning yarn, the pattern and the crochet hook. There are lots of options. Ask for help from the staff in your local yarn and craft shop.

And then, you can also check out the craft sales. Take advantage of the many talented makers who have already created hand crafted items. The nice thing about this option is that the items are ready made; you know exactly what you have. Makers pour their heart and passion into each piece they sell; and you get to give a hand made item without having to make it.

Every year I think I’ll start earlier, but I don’t. And that’s okay. The main thing is to remember that the whole point of making gifts from scratch is to have fun and give gifts that come from the heart. So keep it simple and keep it fun. Put up your feet and enjoy every stitch and you can’t go wrong.

Happy Crafting!

A One Day Pop Up Store – Here on Saturday!

I raised my kids out in the country. For seven years of that time we home schooled. I ran a home based business that allowed me to supplement the family income using my creative talents. It takes a lot to build a home based business. At that time, of course, there weren’t the same opportunities to get your products or services known that we have now. It’s a very different landscape these days. Social media, online platforms like Etsy, Craft markets and Pop up Stores give home based makers a variety of ways to let people know what they have to offer.

Online platforms are fantastic. You can definitely get traction using them. Lots of people order yarn and other fibre related items online. (It’s one of the big challenges to brick and mortar fibre shops, to compete with the effortlessness of buying online.) And yet for those of us who love the oh-so-very tactile nature of fibre arts, there’s nothing like seeing those items in person. After all, isn’t it really all about the squish factor and seeing the richness of the colours in person? I don’t know anyone whose computer screen gives that true sensory experience. 😀

The first time I heard of a pop up store was about a year and a half ago. What a creative idea. Boy, that would have been such a wonderful thing back when I was doing my home based thing all those years ago. To be able to show up, just for one day, in an established business location to offer my wares to the public. To be able to take advantage of their debit machine so people could pay in whatever way they chose to. To have the benefit of extending my reach to include the customers of that sponsoring business. To not have to commit to a full season at a farm and craft market. Yeah, that would have been fantastic. What a great idea!

A while ago I was chatting with the owner of another yarn shop and the topic of Pop up Stores came up. I mentioned that I thought it was a great idea and when she was approached, she shared my contact information with some interested folks. I have a soft spot for makers facing the challenges associated with working from home. There are so many brilliant and creative people designing so many gorgeous things in the fibre arts arena right now. What a wonderful way to bring something a little different into my store. It’s a win-win. I’m so excited!

Judy’s Designs’ first ever Pop Up Store event is coming up this Saturday, October 26th from 10:00 am to 3:30 pm, We’ll be hosting Fat Marmot Knits of Kelowna. How cool is that?

Fat Marmot Knits is a small batch yarn and fibre dying company based in the colourful Okanagan. Nikki first started experimenting with dying wool in 2012. At first it was just a curiosity, but it quickly turned into an obsession. In 2018 Fat Marmot knits was born and Nikki was able to start sharing her passion with the world. Everything is hand dyed in small batches in her kitchen located in the beautiful Okanagan valley. Nikki has developed some repeatable colourways, but often gets distracted by all the possible colour combinations resulting in unique one of a kind skeins and fibre. Fat Marmot Knits was born out of a desire to play with colour on a medium that Nikki has loved for many years!

I love that a lot of what Nikki does is truly one of a kind. There is something refreshing about that. Let’s show her a big warm Revelstoke welcome on Saturday, October 26th!

It’s Here!

One of the things I love about owning a business is that I get to choose what goes on the shelves and racks. In February I met with the rep from Katia Yarns of Spain to take a look at what they have in their Spring and Summer line. It’s exciting that their entire line of yarn and fabric is now being distributed in Canada. This is exciting! The yarn I ordered just came in and as of today it is on the shelves. As much as I really wanted to order a whole lot more, I resisted temptation and limited my order to three different yarns. I’m excited to tell you about them though!

Fair Cotton Craft

This fair trade organic cotton is DIVINE! It’s put up in 200g balls and the “mileage” is superb at 620m! Katia has a number of patterns for this yarn as well; gotta love that. It creates a striped border to a lovely neutral colour. It’s available in four colourways and I have them all in stock now. With a single ball you can make a large child’s sweater. You could get a small to medium ladies’ top out of one ball if you made it with wee cap sleeves or sleeveless. They have a lovely baby blanket pattern and it takes a single ball to complete it.

The price does reflect the fact that it is fair trade and organic. And when you feel it and you see what you can make with a single ball, you won’t care about the price. It’s worth every penny. Since it arrived, I’ve been obsessing over what I want to make with it… as soon as I clear off some of my currently occupied knitting needles. If you scroll down on the link below, you will see the patterns they have for this yarn.

See them here

Scuby Cotton

I have had a lot of people ask me about macrame supplies. My sisters and I did macrame back in the late 1970’s. It’s a lot of fun and easy to get the hang of. Over a year ago I spoke to my suppliers and at that time, they told me this “flash in the pan” fad was on its way out and all they had in supplies were the colours no one wanted any more. Yet, I still had people asking me for macrame supplies. I kept hounding my suppliers and clearly other people did too. Katia’s answer to this demand is Scuby Cotton. They even have a free pattern for a plant hanger that you can download off their website! They have patterns for bags and purses, pillows, a lamp shade and an artistic wall hanging. I am working on carving out time to put together a macrame workshop. (It is likely to be toward the end of May.) This yarn is available in a large range of colours. I only brought in six, and I started with neutrals. If I get enough people interested, I will expand the selection to include other colours. Here’s a link to the yarn and again, if you scroll down, you’ll see all the patterns available. (The free plant hanger pattern is called Kayseri.)

see them here

And last but definitely not least is the Rainbow Big rug kit. Oh MY! This is just so fantastic, I’m bursting with excitement! This gradient yarn comes in a kit with one 700g ball of yarn (YES, you read right!) It seamlessly shifts from one colour to the next. A crochet hook and an easy pattern that will result in a 48″ rug are included with it. That’s a decent size. The yarn is presented in a clear zippered pouch with a grommet in the centre so you can leave the ball in the bag and pull it through the hole to minimize risk of tangling. (If you’re anything like me, you’d be hanging onto that zippered pouch when the rug is finished, to use with other projects.) Think about it. No need to change colours; no big pile of skeins or balls of yarn to manage; an easy crochet pattern; the colourway shifts without any effort and just two tails to weave in when the project is done. It will make anyone look like a genius! I only brought in four of these to begin with, each in a different colourway. If enough people get as excited as I am about these, I’ll happily bring in more. Here’s a link.

At the end of April I’ll be attending Katia’s open house to view and pre-order yarns for next fall and winter. I’ll be checking out their fabrics and sewing patterns too. We’ll see whether or not I’ll dive into that pond when the time comes.

Happy Crafting!

Mysteries of Gauge

There are a number of things that affect the gauge of our knit and crochet projects. Subtle things to consider that can help you to understand how your particular nuances can affect your gauge.

The Gauge Swatch

In terms of knit and crochet, gauge translates to how many stitches across by how many rows high fit in a 10cm x 10cm (4″ x 4″) square. Typically, the expectation is that you will knit or crochet a gauge swatch to identify each yarn’s suitability to a project. You may have seen memes that declare something to the effect that swatches are for sissies. Be aware that most of the people making these declarations are highly experienced. In all fairness, they already know how those different yarns will behave in their hands on their favourite hook or needles. There are times when it’s definitely in your best interest to take the time to work up a gauge swatch. Especially if you are making a fitted garment! Making a blanket or scarf? Gauge won’t be that critical.

So here’s the thing. Each one of us handles our tools similarly, but with subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) differences. These differences ultimately result in variations in tension on our working yarn. That difference in tension subsequently affects the outcome of our gauge.

Breaking it down: Hands & Confidence

Some people have very relaxed hands and will knit with a very “soft” or “gentle” tension. On the other end of the spectrum, some work with an iron grip and stretch the yarn aggressively as they work. Their tension will be “hard” or “tight”. As you can imagine, someone with soft tension will end up with larger, softer stitches than someone with hard tension. I prefer to use the words “hard” and “soft”. Some say tight and loose. The terminology I use relates to how your resulting fabric will feel as well. Soft tension gives you soft fabric, hard tension gives you harder, denser fabric. Obviously, there is a range reflected here. Each of us is somewhere on that spectrum. Add to this that some people are naturally very coordinated and others are not. You can love to crochet or knit and not necessarily be a naturally coordinated person. If that’s you, then you will probably always work with a slightly harder/tighter tension.

It is very common for beginners to have hard tension as they develop the coordination required for either knitting or crochet. The tendency is to have a lot of physical tension in your hands (and shoulders) as you are learning. Your mind will also be working overtime. As you gain experience, most people will gradually become more relaxed both mentally and physically. As confidence grows, the mind, shoulders and hands are able to relax and tension naturally softens. Some folks will still keep a harder tension, even when they are relaxed. None of this is either good or bad, it is just information. What is important is to determine where you are on that scale and how it relates to the resulting tension on your yarn; this relates directly to the gauge you will produce. Hard tension will result in a finer gauge than suggested on a yarn label. If you know that, you can go up a needle/hook size or two to accommodate your tension and get the result that the pattern and yarn identify.

Breaking it Down: Needles & Hooks

Nowadays, you could write an encyclopedia about knitting needles and crochet hooks. You can purchase them made of a very wide range of materials. Each material has its own particular qualities. Talk to anyone who knits and crochets a lot and they will have their favourites. My go-to is generally wood. There are many brands out there. I like Knitter’s Pride Dreamz needles for most things. They are finished wood (as opposed to being raw unfinished wood). I refer to needles on a scale that has “grabby” on one end and “slick” on the other end. I refer to the difference as a range of “smoothness”. Again, that’s my own personal way of describing it. For some yarns I prefer Knitter’s Pride Nova Platina needles. These are what I would refer to as slick. Some people really like a grabby needle that will hold the yarn firmly until they decide to move it. Other people like a very slick needle that will allow the yarn to slide with no effort whatsoever. The different materials used to make the various lines of needles allow you to choose what degree of smoothness you want to work with. When I say needles, I really mean both crochet hooks and knitting needles. It truly applies to both.

In regard to needles, another thing to bear in mind is that different fibres also have varying degrees of grabbiness. This refers to the texture of the yarn and the degree to which the fibres cling to the needle material as you work the yarn. I like to use a variety of needles relative to the project and the yarn I’m using. I’ll choose a smoother needle to work with grabbier yarn, and a grabbier needle to work with smoother yarn. The smoothness of the needles can affect how much tension you hold in your body as you knit. This can subtly affect your gauge as well. You may knit tighter with chrome plated needles than you do with bamboo needles.

How it all Relates:

Each yarn will indicate the gauge you can expect, with suggested needle sizes. The more comfortable and relaxed you are, the closer to the suggested gauge you will work.

Over the next few months I’ll be setting up a permanent “yarn and needle tasting” station in the store. I’ll have a number of baskets, each with a different style of needle and yarn so you can sit down and try them out to see what feels good to you. Stay tuned for updates!

I sincerely hope this information is helpful to you.

Happy Knitting and Crocheting!