Embroidery’s Coming Back!

Over the past five years, I have been delighted to see a resurgence of fibre arts.

Back in the day, I did a lot of cross stitch and embroidery and I’ve been quietly hoping that those arts would come back too. And guess what? They are!

I have had more and more people asking me about embroidery supplies. Embroidery is a precise and time consuming activity. Because of the amount of time that you invest in a piece, it’s important to use good quality supplies that you know will last and will be a solid and beautiful foundation for your work.

High quality thread that will remain colourfast is essential.

DMC has recently added a lot of new colours to their line up. I’ve beefed up my selection of DMC embroidery floss (although I have a long way to go before I have all 500 colours). My gut has been telling me that it’s time to start thinking about what to have on hand for those wanting to explore embroidery and cross stitch. I do plan to expand the colour selection more. The six-strand embroidery floss works well for cross stitch and many other forms of embroidery. If you are familiar with the gorgeous embroidered blouses typical of Ukranian ethnic costumes, those are typically done with a spun embroidery thread that we refer to as “Perle Cotton”. I don’t plan to expand into the perle cotton embroidery thread just yet.

Zweigart is the name most associated with high quality embroidery related fabrics. Their fabrics are top notch and you will never go wrong choosing them. I brought in “quarters” of a number of popular embroidery fabrics in a few colours.

Here’s what we have now:

Aida cloth, is an embroidery fabric woven in a way to make cross-stitch very easy. I have it in 11 and 14 count for now. If there is enough demand I’ll bring in some 18 count. I have this in antique white, black and ivory.

Hardanger is a close relative of Aida cloth. I brought in 22 count in antique white and ivory.

Lugana cloth is a form of even weave fabric in a blend of cotton and viscose. I brought in both 25 and 28 count.

Cashel Linen is another even weave embroidery fabric made of 100% linen. I brought in 28 count in black, antique white and cream.

Belfast Linen: I brought in 32 count in black, antique white and cream.

Waste Canvas: now this stuff is cool. Let’s say you make or buy an outfit or other fabric gift for a baby shower and you want to personalize it a little. Choose a small cross stitch pattern. Once you know how many stitches across it is, you can cut a piece of waste canvas that is a bit bigger than you need. Baste it onto the item where you want the design to be; use the grid of the canvas to guide you to cross stitch directly onto that item (tote bag, clothing… you name it). Once you complete the design, you take a pair of tweezers and pull the individual strands of the waste canvas out. This is very fun to do. I used to do waste canvas projects just so I would be able to pull the strands out of the project. (I absolutely own my weirdness on this! LOL) This is a quick way to make an ordinary item into something very special. Everyone will think you’re a genius! and quite honestly, of course they will! Because you are!

Iron on Transfer Patterns!

Oh my, I remember these from the 1970’s! When I was a kid, there were a couple typical ways that people could practice their embroidery skills. One was to stitch designs on the ends of pillow cases, the other was to embroider tea towels and serviettes or handkerchiefs. We used iron on transfers to place the design onto the fabric and then we would embroider over that design. You could go as simple or as complicated as you wanted to. I brought in one of each of 14 Aunt Martha’s Iron on Transfer Booklets. These themed booklets are packed with small and very do-able embroidery patterns. (I wanted to see them before I stocked multiples.)

Back in the 1970’s there was a product available called Artex. It was a fabric paint that was packaged in tubes. Many people would use the iron-on transfer patterns (like those from Aunt Martha’s) as a guide to paint the picture on their pillow cases, tea towels and other items. You squeezed the tube and that would give you a fine line of paint on the fabric. I had forgot about this product. Aunt Martha’s markets this product now. I didn’t order any this time around. I thought I’d wait and see what sort of response I get first.

We have embroidery hoops, needles and all that stuff. And, when your project is complete and you want to block it, you will need some wooden stretcher bars. We have those too. They are sold in pairs. The idea is that you figure out what size you need and buy a pair for each length of side. So if your project is 10″x 14″, you would buy a pair of 10″ bars and a pair of 14″ bars. They are designed to lock into each other with ease. Use them as the structure to stretch the embroidery project and prepare it for framing.

Little by little, I’ll be adding things to make it easy for embroiderers and cross stitchers to be able to find all their supplies right here, locally. Once my busy winter season settles into spring, I want to start planning some classes for the fall. When the time comes, I will probably bring in blank pillow cases and tea towels and offer basic embroidery classes so folks can try it out and discover just how much enjoyment and satisfaction this wonderful art form has to give. I hope to offer classes on cross stitch and the use of waste canvas too.

Happy Crafting!

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